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Beneficial Effects of Highly Palatable Food on the Behavioral and Neural Adversities induced by Early Life Stress Experience in Female Rats

Title
Beneficial Effects of Highly Palatable Food on the Behavioral and Neural Adversities induced by Early Life Stress Experience in Female Rats
Authors
Kim, JY[Kim, Jin Young]Lee, JH[Lee, Jong-Ho]Kim, D[Kim, Doyun]Kim, SM[Kim, Soung-Min]Koo, J[Koo, JaeHyung]Jahng, JW[Jahng, Jeong Won]
DGIST Authors
Kim, D[Kim, Doyun]; Koo, J[Koo, JaeHyung]
Issue Date
2015
Citation
International Journal of Biological Sciences, 11(10), 1150-1159
Type
Article
Article Type
Article
Keywords
Early Life StressFemaleHighly Palatable FoodNucleus AccumbensRattus
ISSN
1449-2288
Abstract
This study examined the effects of highly palatable food during adolescence on the psycho-emotional and neural disturbances caused by early life stress experience in female rats. Female Sprague-Dawley pups were separated from dam for 3 h daily during the first two weeks of birth (MS) or left undisturbed (NH). Half of MS females received free access to chocolate cookies in addition to ad libitum chow from postnatal day 28. Pups were subjected to the behavioral tests during young adulthood. The plasma corticosterone response to acute stress, ΔFosB and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in the brain regions were analyzed. Total caloric intake and body weight gain during the whole experimental period did not differ among the experimental groups. Cookie access during adolescence and youth improved anxiety-/depression-like behaviors by MS experience. ΔFosB expression was decreased, but BDNF was increased in the nucleus accumbens of MS females, and ΔFosB expression was normalized and BDNF was further increased following cookie access. Corticosterone response to acute stress was blunted by MS experience and cookie access did not improve it. Results suggest that cookie access during adolescence improves the psycho-emotional disturbances of MS females, and ΔFosB and/or BDNF expression in the nucleus accumbens may play a role in its underlying neural mechanisms. © 2015 Ivyspring International Publisher.
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11750/2618
DOI
10.7150/ijbs.12044
Publisher
Ivyspring International Publisher
Related Researcher
  • Author Koo, Jae Hyung The Koo Lab - ChemoReception Laboratory(CRLab)
  • Research Interests
Files:
There are no files associated with this item.
Collection:
New BiologyETC1. Journal Articles


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