Cited 11 time in webofscience Cited 12 time in scopus

Balanced Nucleocytosolic Partitioning Defines a Spatial Network to Coordinate Circadian Physiology in Plants

Title
Balanced Nucleocytosolic Partitioning Defines a Spatial Network to Coordinate Circadian Physiology in Plants
Authors
Kim, Y[Kim, Yumi]Han, S[Han, Seungmin]Yeom, M[Yeom, Miji]Kim, H[Kim, Hyunmin]Lim, J[Lim, Junhyun]Cha, JY[Cha, Joon-Yung]Kim, WY[Kim, Woe-Yeon]Somers, DE[Somers, David E.]Putterill, J[Putterill, Joanna]Nam, HG[Nam, Hong Gil]Hwang, D[Hwang, Daehee]
DGIST Authors
Kim, Y[Kim, Yumi]; Nam, HG[Nam, Hong Gil]
Issue Date
2013-07-15
Citation
Developmental Cell, 26(1), 73-85
Type
Article
Article Type
Article
Keywords
ArabidopsisArabidopsis ProteinsCell NucleusCircadian RhythmComputer SimulationCytosolDNA-Binding ProteinsDNA, PlantFlowersGeneGene Expression Regulation, PlantGenes, PlantGiganteaIntracellular SpaceLHY GeneMathematical ModelModels, BiologicalNoiseNucleotide SequencePhotosynthesisPlant LeavesPriority JournalProtein Interaction Domains and MotifsTranscription Factors
ISSN
1534-5807
Abstract
Biological networks consist of a defined set of regulatory motifs. Subcellular compartmentalization of regulatory molecules can provide a further dimension in implementing regulatory motifs. However, spatial regulatory motifs and their roles in biological networks have rarely been explored. Here we show, using experimentation and mathematical modeling, that spatial segregation of GIGANTEA (GI), a critical component of plant circadian systems, into nuclear and cytosolic compartments leads to differential functions as positive and negative regulators of the circadian core gene, LHY, forming an incoherent feedforward loop to regulate LHY. This regulatory motif formed by nucleocytoplasmic partitioning ofGI confers, through the balanced operation of the nuclear and cytosolic GI, strong rhythmicity and robustness to external and internal noises to the circadian system. Our results show that spatial and functional segregation of a single molecule species into different cellular compartments provides a means for extending the regulatory capabilities of biological networks. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11750/1603
DOI
10.1016/j.devcel.2013.06.006
Publisher
Cell Press
Related Researcher
Files:
There are no files associated with this item.
Collection:
New BiologyETC1. Journal Articles


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