Cited 0 time in webofscience Cited 1 time in scopus

Arginine thiazolidine carboxylate stimulates insulin secretion through production of Ca2+-mobilizing second messengers NAADP and cADPR in pancreatic islets

Title
Arginine thiazolidine carboxylate stimulates insulin secretion through production of Ca2+-mobilizing second messengers NAADP and cADPR in pancreatic islets
Authors
Park, D.-R.[Park, Dae Ryoung]Shawl, A.I.[Shawl, Asif Iqbal]Ha, T.-G.[Ha, Tae Geun]Park, K.-H.[Park, Kwang Hyun]Kim, S.-Y.[Kim, Seon Young]Kim, U.-H.[Kim, Uh Hyun]
DGIST Authors
Shawl, A.I.[Shawl, Asif Iqbal]
Issue Date
2015
Citation
PLoS ONE, 10(8)
Type
Article
Article Type
Article
Keywords
Animal CellAnimal ExperimentAntidiabetic ActivityArginineArginine Thiazolidine Carboxylic AcidCalcium Cell LevelCalcium SignalingCD38 AntigenConcentration ResponseControlled StudyCyclic Adenosine Diphosphate RiboseDose-ResponseDrug PotencyEnzyme Linked Immunosorbent AssayGlitazone DerivativeGlucoseGlucose Blood LevelGlutathioneInsulin ReleaseMaleNicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide PhosphateNitric OxideNitric Oxide SynthaseNon-HumanPancreas Islet Beta CellProtein FunctionProtein SynthesisRatUnclassified Drug
ISSN
1932-6203
Abstract
Oxothiazolidine carboxylic acid is a prodrug of cysteine that acts as an anti-diabetic agent via insulin secretion and the formation of the Ca2+-mobilizing second messenger, cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR). Here we show that a hybrid compound, arginine thiazolidine carboxylate (ATC), increases cytoplasmic Ca2+ in pancreatic β-cells, and that the ATC-induced Ca2+ signals result from the sequential formation of two Ca2+-mobilizing second messengers: nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) and cADPR. Our data demonstrate that ATC has potent insulin-releasing properties, due to the additive action of its two components; thiazolidine carboxylate (TC) and L-arginine. TC increases glutathione (GSH) levels, resulting in cAMP production, followed by a cascade pathway of NAADP/nitric oxide (NO)/cGMP/cADPR synthesis. L-arginine serves as the substrate for NO synthase (NOS), which results in cADPR synthesis via cGMP formation. Neuronal NOS is specifically activated in pancreatic β-cells upon ATC treatment. These results suggest that ATC is an ideal candidate as an anti-diabetic, capable of modulating the physiological Ca2+ signalling pathway to stimulate insulin secretion. © 2015 Park et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11750/2615
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0134962
Publisher
Public Library of Science
Files:
There are no files associated with this item.
Collection:
Emerging Materials ScienceLab for NanoBio-Materials & SpinTronics(nBEST)1. Journal Articles


qrcode mendeley

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

BROWSE