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Endoplasmic reticulum stress in the regulation of liver diseases: Involvement of Regulated IRE1 alpha and beta-dependent decay and miRNA

Title
Endoplasmic reticulum stress in the regulation of liver diseases: Involvement of Regulated IRE1 alpha and beta-dependent decay and miRNA
Authors
Rashid, Harun-OrKim, Hyun-KyoungJunjappa, RaghupatilKim, Hyung-RyongChae, Han-Jung
DGIST Authors
Kim, Hyung-Ryong
Issue Date
2017-05
Citation
Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 32(5), 981-991
Type
Article
Article Type
Review
Keywords
ActivationCellsER StressER StressHepatic SteatosisInhibitionInnate ImmunityLipid MetabolismLiver DiseaseMessenger RNAmiRNAProtects MiceRIDDRIG IStress Mediated Toxicity
ISSN
0815-9319
Abstract
Compromised protein folding capacity in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) leads to a protein traffic jam that produces a toxic environment called ER stress. However, the ER smartly handles such a critical situation by activating a cascade of proteins responsible for sensing and responding to the noxious stimuli of accumulated proteins. The ER protein load is higher in secretory cells, such as liver hepatocytes, which are thus prone to stress-mediated toxicity and various diseases, including alcohol-induced liver injury, fatty liver disease, and viral hepatitis. Therefore, we discuss the molecular cues that connect ER stress to hepatic diseases. Moreover, we review the literature on ER stress-regulated miRNA in the pathogenesis of liver diseases to give a comprehensive overview of mechanistic insights connecting ER stress and miRNA in the context of liver diseases. We also discuss currently discovered regulated IRE1 dependent decay in regulation of hepatic diseases. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11750/4179
DOI
10.1111/jgh.13619
Publisher
Blackwell Publishing
Files:
There are no files associated with this item.
Collection:
ETC1. Journal Articles


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