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Esr1+ cells in the ventromedial hypothalamus control female aggression

Title
Esr1+ cells in the ventromedial hypothalamus control female aggression
Authors
Hashikawa, K.Hashikawa, Y.Tremblay, R.Zhang, J.Feng, J.E.Sabol, A.Piper, W.T.Lee, Hyo SangRudy, B.Lin, D.
DGIST Authors
Lee, Hyo Sang
Issue Date
2017
Citation
Nature Neuroscience, 20(11), 1580-1590
Type
Article
Article Type
Article
Keywords
ActivityAdultAggressionAnimalAnimal CellAnimal ExperimentAnimal TissueAnimalsArticleBiosynthesisBrain CellBrain FunctionC57Bl MouseCell ActivationControlled StudyCytologyElectrical-StimulationEstrogen Receptor AlphaFemaleFightingGene ExpressionHypothalamus Ventromedial NucleusLordosis ReflexMaleMale-MiceMaternal AggressionMatingMedial Preoptic AreaMetabolismMiceMice, Inbred C57BlMice, TransgenicMouseNerve CellNeuralNeuronsNonhumanNucleusPhysiologyPriority JournalProgesterone ReceptorPsychologySexual BehaviorSexual Behavior, AnimalSocial BehaviorTransgenic MouseVentromedial Hypothalamic NucleusZona Incerta
ISSN
1097-6256
Abstract
As an essential means of resolving conflicts, aggression is expressed by both sexes but often at a higher level in males than in females. Recent studies suggest that cells in the ventrolateral part of the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMHvl) that express estrogen receptor-α (Esr1) and progesterone receptor are essential for male but not female mouse aggression. In contrast, here we show that VMHvl Esr1+ cells are indispensable for female aggression. This population was active when females attacked naturally. Inactivation of these cells reduced female aggression whereas their activation elicited attack. Additionally, we found that female VMHvl contains two anatomically distinguishable subdivisions that showed differential gene expression, projection and activation patterns after mating and fighting. These results support an essential role of the VMHvl in both male and female aggression and reveal the existence of two previously unappreciated subdivisions in the female VMHvl that are involved in distinct social behaviors.
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11750/4759
DOI
10.1038/nn.4644
Publisher
Nature Publishing Group
Files:
There are no files associated with this item.
Collection:
Brain and Cognitive SciencesLaboratory of Affective Neuroscience1. Journal Articles


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