Cited 0 time in webofscience Cited 1 time in scopus

Water strider females use individual experience to adjust jumping behaviour to their weight within physical constraints of water surface tension

Title
Water strider females use individual experience to adjust jumping behaviour to their weight within physical constraints of water surface tension
Authors
Baek, MinjungLawin, Katherine M.Codden, Christina J.Lim, HangkyoYang, EunjinKim, Ho-YoungLee, Sang-imJablonski, Piotr G.
DGIST Authors
Baek, Minjung; Lawin, Katherine M.; Codden, Christina J.; Lim, Hangkyo; Yang, Eunjin; Kim, Ho-Young; Lee, Sang-im; Jablonski, Piotr G.
Issue Date
2020-10
Citation
Scientific Reports, 10(1), 18657
Type
Article
Article Type
Article
Keywords
PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITYPREDATION RISKGERRIS-LACUSTRISEVOLUTIONSELECTIONCOSTSCONFLICTHABITUATIONWALKINGLIMITS
ISSN
2045-2322
Abstract
Different species of water striders match leg speeds to their body sizes to maximize their jump take off velocity without breaking the water surface, which might have aided evolution of leg structures optimized for exploitation of the water surface tension. It is not understood how water striders achieve this match. Can individuals modify their leg movements based on their body mass and locomotor experience? Here we tested if water striders, Gerris latiabdominis, adjust jumping behaviour based on their personal experience and how an experimentally added body weight affects this process. Females, but not males, modified their jumping behaviour in weight-dependent manner, but only when they experienced frequent jumping. They did so within the environmental constraint set by the physics of water surface tension. Females’ ability to adjust jumping may represent their adaptation to frequent increases or decreases of the weight that they support as mating bouts, during which males ride on top of females, start or end, respectively. This suggests that natural selection for optimized biomechanics combined with sexual selection for mating adaptations shapes this ability to optimally exploit water surface tension, which might have aided adaptive radiation of Gerromorpha into a diversity of semiaquatic niches. © 2020, The Author(s).
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11750/12608
DOI
10.1038/s41598-020-75564-x
Publisher
Nature Publishing Group
Related Researcher
Files:
Collection:
Department of New BiologyLab of Integrative Animal Ecology1. Journal Articles


qrcode mendeley

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

BROWSE