Cited 2 time in webofscience Cited 2 time in scopus

Bioinspired Hairy Skin Electronics for Detecting the Direction and Incident Angle of Airflow

Title
Bioinspired Hairy Skin Electronics for Detecting the Direction and Incident Angle of Airflow
Authors
Chun, SungwooSon, WonkyeongChoi, ChangsoonMin, HyeonghoKim, JiwonLee, Heon JoonKim, DongjinKim, ChanghwanKoh, Je-sungPang, Changhyun
DGIST Authors
Choi, Changsoon
Issue Date
2019-04
Citation
ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, 11(14), 13608-13615
Type
Article
Article Type
Article
Author Keywords
biosensorE-skinflexible devicegraphenemicrohair
Keywords
Aspect ratioBiomedical engineeringBiosensorsSolventsElectrical signalFlexible deviceHigh aspect ratiomicrohairMultimodal detectionPercolation networksStructural displacementTactile perceptionGraphene
ISSN
1944-8244
Abstract
The human skin has inspired multimodal detection using smart devices or systems in fields including biomedical engineering, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Hairs of a high aspect ratio (AR) connected to follicles, in particular, detect subtle structural displacements by airflow or ultralight touch above the skin. Here, hairy skin electronics assembled with an array of graphene sensors (16 pixels) and artificial microhairs for multimodal detection of tactile stimuli and details of airflows (e.g., intensity, direction, and incident angle) are presented. Composed of percolation networks of graphene nanoplatelet sheets, the sensor array can simultaneously detect pressure, temperature, and vibration, all of which correspond to the sensing range of human tactile perceptions with ultrahigh response time (<0.5 ms, 2 kHz) for restoration. The device covered with microhairs (50 μm diameter and 300 μm height, AR = 6, hexagonal layout, and ∼4400/cm 2 ) exhibits mapping of electrical signals induced by noncontact airflow and identifying the direction, incident angle, and intensity of wind to the sensor. For potential applications, we implement the hairy electronics to a sailing robot and demonstrate changes in locomotion and speed by detecting the direction and intensity of airflow. © Copyright 2019 American Chemical Society.
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11750/9823
DOI
10.1021/acsami.9b01427
Publisher
American Chemical Society
Related Researcher
Files:
There are no files associated with this item.
Collection:
Smart Textile Convergence Research Group1. Journal Articles


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