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The difference in cortical activation pattern for complex motor skills: A functional near- infrared spectroscopy study

Title
The difference in cortical activation pattern for complex motor skills: A functional near- infrared spectroscopy study
Authors
Lee, Seung HyunJin, Sang-HyeonAn, Jinung
DGIST Authors
Jin, Sang-Hyeon; An, Jinung
Issue Date
2019-10
Citation
Scientific Reports, 9(1), 14066
Type
Article
Article Type
Article
Keywords
BRAIN ACTIVATIONFNIRS DATACORTEXCONNECTIVITYHANDEDNESSASYMMETRYMOVEMENTSAREASMRILATERALIZATION
ISSN
2045-2322
Abstract
The human brain is lateralized to dominant or non-dominant hemispheres, and controlled through large-scale neural networks between correlated cortical regions. Recently, many neuroimaging studies have been conducted to examine the origin of brain lateralization, but this is still unclear. In this study, we examined the differences in brain activation in subjects according to dominant and non-dominant hands while using chopsticks. Fifteen healthy right-handed subjects were recruited to perform tasks which included transferring almonds using stainless steel chopsticks. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) was used to acquire the hemodynamic response over the primary sensory-motor cortex (SM1), premotor area (PMC), supplementary motor area (SMA), and frontal cortex. We measured the concentrations of oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin induced during the use of chopsticks with dominant and non-dominant hands. While using the dominant hand, brain activation was observed on the contralateral side. While using the non-dominant hand, brain activation was observed on the ipsilateral side as well as the contralateral side. These results demonstrate dominance and functional asymmetry of the cerebral hemisphere. © 2019, The Author(s).
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11750/10893
DOI
10.1038/s41598-019-50644-9
Publisher
Nature Publishing Group
Related Researcher
Files:
Collection:
Division of Intelligent Robotics1. Journal Articles


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