Cited 7 time in webofscience Cited 8 time in scopus

Abiotic production of sugar phosphates and uridine ribonudeoside in aqueous microdroplets

Title
Abiotic production of sugar phosphates and uridine ribonudeoside in aqueous microdroplets
Authors
Nam, InhoLee, Jae KyooNam, Hong GilZare, Richard N.
DGIST Authors
Nam, Hong Gil
Issue Date
2017-11
Citation
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 114(47), 12396-12400
Type
Article
Article Type
Article
Keywords
ALPHA-D-RIBOSESUM-FREQUENCY SPECTROSCOPYD-GLUCOSE 1-PHOSPHATEMOLECULAR-ORGANIZATIONELECTROSPRAY-IONIZATIONCHARGED MICRODROPLETSATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLSDROPLET EVAPORATIONMASS-SPECTROMETRYWATER
ISSN
0027-8424
Abstract
Phosphorylation is an essential chemical reaction for life. This reaction generates fundamental cell components, including building blocks for RNA and DNA, phospholipids for cell walls, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) for energy storage. However, phosphorylation reactions are thermodynamically unfavorable in solution. Consequently, a long-standing question in prebiotic chemistry is how abiotic phosphorylation occurs in biological compounds. We find that the phosphorylation of various sugars to form sugar-1-phosphates can proceed spontaneously in aqueous microdroplets containing a simple mixture of sugars and phosphoric acid. The yield for D-ribose-1-phosphate reached over 6% at room temperature, giving a ΔG value of −1.1 kcal/mol, much lower than the +5.4 kcal/mol for the reaction in bulk solution. The temperature dependence of the product yield for the phosphorylation in microdroplets revealed a negative enthalpy change (ΔH = −0.9 kcal/mol) and a negligible change of entropy (ΔS = 0.0007 kcal/mol·K). Thus, the spontaneous phosphorylation reaction in microdroplets occurred by overcoming the entropic hurdle of the reaction encountered in bulk solution. Moreover, uridine, a pyrimidine ribonucleoside, is generated in aqueous microdroplets containing D-ribose, phosphoric acid, and uracil, which suggests the possibility that microdroplets could serve as a prebiotic synthetic pathway for ribonucleosides. © 2017, National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11750/4844
DOI
10.1073/pnas.1714896114
Publisher
National Academy of Sciences
Related Researcher
  • Author Nam, Hong Gil CBRG(Complex Biology Research Group)
  • Research Interests Plant Aging and Life History; Systems Biology; Complexbiology; Comparative Aging Research
Files:
There are no files associated with this item.
Collection:
Department of New BiologyCBRG(Complex Biology Research Group)1. Journal Articles


qrcode mendeley

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

BROWSE