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Water-Resistant and Skin-Adhesive Wearable Electronics Using Graphene Fabric Sensor with Octopus-Inspired Microsuckers

Title
Water-Resistant and Skin-Adhesive Wearable Electronics Using Graphene Fabric Sensor with Octopus-Inspired Microsuckers
Authors
Chun, SungwooSon, WonkyeongKim, Da WanLee, JihyunMin, HyeonghoJung, HachulKwon, DahyeKim, A-HeeKim, Young-JinLim, Sang KyooPang, ChanghyunChoi, Changsoon
DGIST Authors
Lim, Sang KyooChoi, Changsoon
Issue Date
2019-05
Citation
ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, 11(18), 16951-16957
Type
Article
Article Type
Article
Author Keyword
fabric sensor; graphene-coated fabrics; strain sensors; wearable sensors; pressure sensors
Keyword
Adhesives; Electrocardiography; Graphene; Health care; Medical applications; Molluscs; Pressure sensors; Protective coatings; Shellfish; Smart textiles; Coated fabrics; Efficient monitoring; Electronic fabrics; Fabric sensors; Fabrication method; Monitoring device; Physiological signals; Strain sensors; Wearable sensors
ISSN
1944-8244
Abstract
Wearable and skin-attachable electronics with portable/wearable and stretchable smart sensors are essential for health-care monitoring devices or systems. The property of adhesion to the skin in both dry and wet environments is strongly required for efficient monitoring of various human activities. We report here a facile, low-cost, scalable fabrication method for skin-adhesive graphene-coated fabric (GCF) sensors that are sensitive and respond fast to applied pressure and strain. With octopus-like patterns formed on the side of the GCF that touches the skin, the GCF adheres strongly to the skin in both dry and wet environments. Using these characteristics, we demonstrate efficient monitoring of a full range of human activities, including human physiological signals such as wrist pulse and electrocardiography (ECG), as well as body motions and speech vibrations. In particular, both measurements of ECG and wrist-bending motions were demonstrated even in wet conditions. Our approach has opened up a new possibility for wearable and skin-adherent electronic fabric sensors working even in wet environments for health-care monitoring and medical applications in vitro and in vivo. © 2019 American Chemical Society.
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11750/9872
DOI
10.1021/acsami.9b04206
Publisher
American Chemical Society
Related Researcher
Files:
There are no files associated with this item.
Collection:
Smart Textile Convergence Research Group1. Journal Articles


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