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Micrometer-Sized Water Droplets Induce Spontaneous Reduction

Title
Micrometer-Sized Water Droplets Induce Spontaneous Reduction
Authors
Lee, Jae KyooSamanta, DevleenaNam, Hong GilZare, Richard N.
DGIST Authors
Nam, Hong Gil
Issue Date
2019-07
Citation
Journal of the American Chemical Society, 141(27), 10585-10589
Type
Article
Article Type
Article
Keywords
MASS-SPECTROMETRYCHEMISTRYDEPENDENCERADICALSDYNAMICSPROTONSSURFACEACID
ISSN
0002-7863
Abstract
Bulk water serves as an inert solvent for many chemical and biological reactions. Here, we report a striking exception. We observe that in micrometer-sized water droplets (microdroplets), spontaneous reduction of several organic molecules occurs, pyruvate to lactate, lipoic acid to dihydrolipoic acid, fumarate to succinate, and oxaloacetate to malate. This reduction proceeds in microdroplets without any added electron donors or acceptors and without any applied voltage. In three of the four cases, the reduction efficiency is 90% or greater when the concentration of the dissolved organic species is less than 0.1 mu M. None of these reactions occurs spontaneously in bulk water. One example demonstrating the possible broad application of reduction in water micro droplets to organic molecules is the reduction of acetophenone to form 1-phenylethanol. Taken together, these results show that microdroplets 'provide a new foundation for green chemistry by rendering water molecules to be highly electrochemically active without any added reducing agent or applied potential. In this manner, aqueous microdroplets might have provided a route for abiotic reduction reactions in the prebiotic era, thereby providing organic molecules with a reducing power before the advent of biotic reducing machineries.
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11750/10396
DOI
10.1021/jacs.9b03227
Publisher
American Chemical Society
Related Researcher
  • Author Nam, Hong Gil CBRG(Complex Biology Research Group)
  • Research Interests Plant Aging and Life History; Systems Biology; Complexbiology; Comparative Aging Research
Files:
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Collection:
Department of New BiologyCBRG(Complex Biology Research Group)1. Journal Articles


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