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A role of anterior cingulate cortex in the emergence of worker-parasite relationship

Title
A role of anterior cingulate cortex in the emergence of worker-parasite relationship
Authors
Ahn, SoyounKang, YujeongLee, Jong WonJeong, Se JinLee, Yoo JinLee, SoominKim, JeongyeonKoo, Ja WookKim, Jeansok J.Jung, Min Whan
DGIST Authors
Ahn, Soyoun; Kang, Yujeong; Lee, Jong Won; Jeong, Se Jin; Lee, Yoo Jin; Lee, Soomin; Kim, Jeongyeon; Koo, Ja Wook; Kim, Jeansok J.; Jung, Min Whan
Issue Date
2021-11
Citation
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 118(48)
Type
Article
Author Keywords
workload imbalancelabor exploitationsocial dilemmasocial decision-makingaltruism
Keywords
MEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEXFRONTAL-CORTEXNEURAL MECHANISMSSOCIAL COGNITIONDECISION-MAKINGGENE-EXPRESSIONBEHAVIORRATSCOMPETITIONBRAIN
ISSN
0027-8424
Abstract
We studied the brain mechanisms underlying action selection in a social dilemma setting in which individuals' effortful gains are unfairly distributed among group members. A stable "worker-parasite" relationship developed when three individually operant-conditioned rats were placed together in a Skinner box equipped with response lever and food dispenser on opposite sides. Specifically, one rat, the "worker," engaged in lever-pressing while the other two "parasitic" rats profited from the worker's effort by crowding the feeder in anticipation of food. Anatomically, c-Fos expression in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) was significantly higher in worker rats than in parasite rats. Functionally, ACC inactivation suppressed the worker's lever-press behavior drastically under social, but only mildly under individual, settings. Transcriptionally, GABA(A) receptor- and potassium channel-related messenger RNA expressions were reliably lower in the worker's, relative to parasite's, ACC. These findings indicate the requirement of ACC activation for the expression of exploitable, effortful behavior, which could be mediated by molecular pathways involving GABA(A) receptor/potassium channel proteins.
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11750/15915
DOI
10.1073/pnas.2111145118
Publisher
National Academy of Sciences
Files:
There are no files associated with this item.
Collection:
Department of Brain SciencesETC1. Journal Articles


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