Cited 19 time in webofscience Cited 17 time in scopus

beta 1-integrin-dependent migration of microglia in response to neuron-released alpha-synuclein

Title
beta 1-integrin-dependent migration of microglia in response to neuron-released alpha-synuclein
Authors
Kim, ChangyounCho, Eun-DeokKim, Hyung-KooYou, SungyongLee, He-JinHwang, Dae HeeLee, Seung-Jae
DGIST Authors
Hwang, Dae Hee
Issue Date
2014-04
Citation
Experimental and Molecular Medicine, 46
Type
Article
Article Type
Article
Keywords
PARKINSONS-DISEASEAMYLOID-BETAINDUCED NEUROTOXICITYALZHEIMERS-DISEASECELL-DEATHACTIVATIONINTEGRINSPROMOTESEXOCYTOSISRECEPTOR
ISSN
1226-3613
Abstract
Chronic neuroinflammation is an integral pathological feature of major neurodegenerative diseases. The recruitment of microglia to affected brain regions and the activation of these cells are the major events leading to disease-associated neuroinflammation. In a previous study, we showed that neuron-released α-synuclein can activate microglia through activating the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) pathway, resulting in proinflammatory responses. However, it is not clear whether other signaling pathways are involved in the migration and activation of microglia in response to neuron-released α-synuclein. In the current study, we demonstrated that TLR2 activation is not sufficient for all of the changes manifested by microglia in response to neuronreleased α-synuclein. Specifically, the migration of and morphological changes in microglia, triggered by neuron-released α-synuclein, did not require the activation of TLR2, whereas increased proliferation and production of cytokines were strictly under the control of TLR2. Construction of a hypothetical signaling network using computational tools and experimental validation with various peptide inhibitors showed that α1-integrin was necessary for both the morphological changes and the migration. However, neither proliferation nor cytokine production by microglia was dependent on the activation of α1-integrin. These results suggest that α1-integrin signaling is specifically responsible for the recruitment of microglia to the diseaseaffected brain regions, where neurons most likely release relatively high levels of α-synuclein. © 2014.
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11750/5814
DOI
10.1038/emm.2014.6
Publisher
Nature Publishing Group
Related Researcher
  • Author Hwang, Dae Hee Systems Biology and Medicine Lab
  • Research Interests Multilayered spatiotemporal networks; Regulatory motifs or pathways; Metabolite-protein networks; Network stochasticity; Proteomics and informatics
Files:
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Collection:
Department of New BiologySystems Biology and Medicine Lab1. Journal Articles


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