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Cx3cr1(CreERT2)-driven Atg7 deletion in adult mice induces intestinal adhesion

Title
Cx3cr1(CreERT2)-driven Atg7 deletion in adult mice induces intestinal adhesion
Authors
Lee, YounghwanLee, Ji-WonNam, HyeriYu, Seong-Woon
DGIST Authors
Yu, Seong-Woon
Issue Date
2020-06
Citation
Molecular Brain, 13(1), 88
Type
Article
Article Type
Article
Keywords
CELLSSUSCEPTIBILITYMONOCYTESREVEALSPROTEIN
ISSN
1756-6606
Abstract
Microglia are macrophages resident in the central nervous system. C-X3-C motif chemokine receptor 1 (CX3CR1) is a Gαi-coupled seven-transmembrane protein exclusively expressed in the mononuclear phagocyte system including microglia, as well as intestinal and kidney macrophages. Cx3cr1 CreERT2 mice express Cre recombinase in a tamoxifen-inducible manner and have been widely used to delete target genes in microglia, since microglia are long-lived cells and outlive peripheral macrophages, which continuously turn over and lose their gene modification over time. ATG7 is an E1-like enzyme that plays an essential role in two ubiquitin-like reactions, ATG12-ATG5 conjugation and LC3-lipidation in autophagy. To study the role of ATG7 in adult microglia, we generated Cx3cr1 CreERT2 :Atg7 fl/fl mice and deleted Atg7 at the age of 8 weeks, and found induction of intestinal adhesion. Since intestinal adhesion is caused by excessive inflammation, these results suggest that deletion of Atg7 in intestinal macrophages even for a short time results in inflammation that cannot be rescued by replenishment with wild-type intestinal macrophages. Our finding suggests that, depending on the roles of the gene, Cx3cr1-Cre-mediated gene deletion may yield unanticipated physiological outcomes outside the central nervous system, and careful necropsy is necessary to assure the microglia-specific roles of the target gene. © 2020 The Author(s).
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11750/12247
DOI
10.1186/s13041-020-00630-4
Publisher
BioMed Central
Related Researcher
  • Author Yu, Seong-Woon Laboratory of Neuronal Cell Death
  • Research Interests Molecular mechanisms of neuronal cell death and neurodegeneration
Files:
Collection:
Department of Brain and Cognitive SciencesLaboratory of Neuronal Cell Death1. Journal Articles


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